Being an Eyewitness

A feature writer must be an eyewitness to a story for a number of reasons. The value of being an eyewitness to a story you are reporting on is unmatched. It prevents hoaxes, and is a great verification method. It helps to give a feature story drama and an atmosphere, and it helps to pick up material you might have otherwise missed. An eyewitness should observe the subject in their natural habitat. You should watch them in their jobs, at their churches, and anywhere locals might go. Once you are on the scene, you must look for everything about the subject including how they look, how they carry themselves, their gestures, their speech patters, and just about everything they do. You also look at their home and their furniture, the weather, and if they have any books. You incorporate all of this into the story by first recording everything you see, then picking and choosing and writing as many drafts as you possibly can.

Two interviewing techniques that are interesting from the MP3 are not making any noise when people are talking. This is effective because it makes for great sound bites, and leaves more time for the actual person who is being interviewed to talk. The interviewer also asked many people the same questions. It was really interesting to hear from people what the block was like 30 years ago, and how it is compared to today, because the person was actually there for that, and can give an eyewitness account.

A feature writer must be an eyewitness to a story for a number of reasons. The value of being an eyewitness to a story you are reporting on is unmatched. It prevents hoaxes, and is a great verification method. It helps to give a feature story drama and an atmosphere, and it helps to pick up material you might have otherwise missed. An eyewitness should observe the subject in their natural habitat. You should watch them in their jobs, at their churches, and anywhere locals might go. Once you are on the scene, you must look for everything about the subject including how they look, how they carry themselves, their gestures, their speech patters, and just about everything they do. You also look at their home and their furniture, the weather, and if they have any books. You incorporate all of this into the story by first recording everything you see, then picking and choosing and writing as many drafts as you possibly can.

Two interviewing techniques that are interesting from the MP3 are not making any noise when people are talking. This is effective because it makes for great sound bites, and leaves more time for the actual person who is being interviewed to talk. The interviewer also asked many people the same questions. It was really interesting to hear from people what the block was like 30 years ago, and how it is compared to today, because the person was actually there for that, and can give an eyewitness account.

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